Category Archives: Photography

Greek Mythology

Around 700 BC, the poet Hesiod’s Theogony offered the first written cosmogony, or origin story, of Greek mythology. The Theogony tells the story of the universe’s journey from nothingness (Chaos, a primeval void) to being, and details an elaborate family tree of elements, gods and goddesses who evolved from Chaos and descended from Gaia (Earth), Ouranos (Sky), Pontos (Sea) and Tartaros (the Underworld).

Pantheon

Greek Mythology: The Olympians

At the center of Greek mythology is the pantheon of deities who were said to live on Mount Olympus, the highest mountain in Greece. From their perch, they ruled every aspect of human life. Olympian gods and goddesses looked like men and women (though they could change themselves into animals and other things) and were–as many myths recounted–vulnerable to human foibles and passions.

The twelve main Olympians are:

  • Zeus (Jupiter, in Roman mythology): the king of all the gods (and father to many) and god of weather, law and fate
  • Hera (Juno): the queen of the gods and goddess of women and marriage
  • Aphrodite (Venus): goddess of beauty and love
  • Apollo (Apollo): god of prophesy, music and poetry and knowledge
  • Ares (Mars): god of war
  • Artemis (Diana): goddess of hunting, animals and childbirth
  • Athena (Minerva): goddess of wisdom and defense
  • Demeter (Ceres): goddess of agriculture and grain
  • Dionysos (Bacchus): god of wine, pleasure and festivity
  • Hephaistos (Vulcan): god of fire, metalworking and sculpture
  • Hermes (Mercury): god of travel, hospitality and trade and Zeus’s personal messenger
  • Poseidon (Neptune): god of the sea

Other gods and goddesses sometimes included in the roster of Olympians are:

  • Hades (Pluto): god of the underworld
  • Hestia (Vesta): goddess of home and family
  • Eros (Cupid): god of sex and minion to Aphrodite
Temple of Zeus the Olympian

Greek Mythology: Heroes and Monsters

Greek mythology does not just tell the stories of gods and goddesses, however.

Human heroes–such as Heracles, the adventurer who performed 12 impossible labors for King Eurystheus (and was subsequently worshipped as a god for his accomplishment); Pandora, the first woman, whose curiosity brought evil to mankind; Pygmalion, the king who fell in love with an ivory statue; Arachne, the weaver who was turned into a spider for her arrogance; handsome Trojan prince Ganymede who became the cupbearer for the gods; Midas, the king with the golden touch; and Narcissus, the young man who fell in love with his own reflection–are just as significant. Monsters and “hybrids” (human-animal forms) also feature prominently in the tales: the winged horse Pegasus, the horse-man Centaur, the lion-woman Sphinx and the bird-woman Harpies, the one-eyed giant Cyclops, automatons (metal creatures given life by Hephaistos), manticores and unicorns, Gorgons, pygmies, minotaurs, satyrs and dragons of all sorts. Many of these creatures have become almost as well known as the gods, goddesses and heroes who share their stories.

Temple of Apollos in Naxos

Reference: https://www.history.com/topics/ancient-history/greek-mythology

Ancient Ruins in Athens

A walk around Athens and you’d surely come up to a important ancient sites from the Classical and Roman times

The Acroplis

The Acropolis also called the Sacred Rock, is the most important ancient heritage of the country. It is also the trademark and most famous site of Athens and of Greece. It has been the main attraction of Athens since the 5th century BC and is dedicated to Athena, the goddess of wisdom and protector of the city.

Acropolis

The Parthenon

The Parthenon, the most famous ancient Greek temple ever, stands proudly over the modern megalopolis of Athens, a reminder of the great civilization he has witnessed. The Acropolis can be seen from almost every part of Athens. It was and still is, without any doubt, the ultimate achievement of the city classical and architectural glory

Parthenon

Herodeion Theatre

The Herodeion Theatre is one of the most impressive monuments of Athens and it is today hosting the Athens Festival with performances of theatre, music, and dance. The theatre is open to visitors only during performances. It is located at the south slope of the Acropolis and was added in 161 AD during the Roman rule. The theatre was built by Herodes Atticus, a wealthy Roman, in memory of his wife Regilla. It has exceptional acoustic capacities and can sit up to 5,000 spectators. It has a facade of 28 m high and 2,4 m width.

Herodeion Theatre

Temple of Hephaestus

The Temple of Hephaestus is the best preserved Doric temple in Greece. It was dedicated to Hephaestus, the god of the forge, hence the reason why the temple used to be in the center of numerous metalwork shops and foundries. It was built during Pericles rebuilding program.

Temple of Hephaestus

Temple of Zeus

The Temple of Olympian Zeus took 700 years to be built and is the larger that was ever created. The work was completed by Emperor Hadrian in 131 AD. The huge Temple is composed of 104 Corinthian columns of 17 m high. Very little is left of his greatness today since only 17 columns are still standing.

Temple of Olympian Zeus
Panathenaic Stadium

Panathenaic Stadium

The Panathenaic (Roman) Stadium was built in the 4th century BC. It was hosting the Panathenaic Athletic contests. Herodes Atticus inaugurated the stadium when he rebuilds the seats with Pentelic marble. The stadium was strangely abandoned for centuries. It was finally restored in order to welcome the first modern Olympic Games of 1896.

Arch of Hadrian

Arch of Hadrian

The Arch of Hadrian was built by Emperor Hadrian in 132 AD in order to mark the limit between Ancient Athens and his new city. It is also a commemoration of the consecration of the Temple of Olympian Zeus. It is located at the end of Amalias Avenue.

Source: https://www.greeka.com/attica/athens/ancient-sites/

Room at the Top of the Inn

I wanted to visit some Greek islands before my trip back to Papua New Guinea early February. My online search recommended Mykonos and Santorini as the place to go. However, when I told my travel agent ‘Makis’ that I wanted to go Mykonos……he was like……’there is nobody there’! Mykonos only comes to life during summer but now is winter and everyone has left.

He then recommended that I do Naxos instead. I was reluctant as I didn’t read up Naxos and I didn’t think it was fun to visit as well. He told there is a new place ‘Grotta Hotel’ that he can put me up for a few nights before I go Santorini.

I reluctantly agreed…….so he book me on a on a trip to the Greek island of Naxos. Naxos is located in the South Aegean and is the largest of the Cycladic islands filled with white-washed, cube-shaped houses and vibrant small town life.

Arrival in Hotel Grotta

As soon as I arrived at ‘Grotta Hotel’ I was blown away on how beautiful the view is. . It was a small but luxurious place to stay and had a stunning view of the sea both from the windows and patio and also from the restaurant.

Lucky for me, it was located right on a hill ner the beach. It was incredible to wake up each morning with the Aegean in our front yards, and I would highly recommend renting a villa or room here if you are planning to visit Naxos.

As since, it just opened. I was the only ‘Lonely Guest’ in the most beautiful, scenic hotel one could ever imagine to stay. I stayed there for two nights and were taken aback by the beauty of the island and architecture, as well as the local culture and food.

To make the most of your trip to Naxos, I recommend that you rent a car, so you have the autonomy to explore the island yourself. There are so many incredible sites to visit and renting a car opposed to relying on public transformation or hiring a driver gives you a lot more freedom.

Naxos is somewhere I would recommend visiting if you find your way to Greece, and offers so many ways to experience the culture, cuisine, and history. I would most definitely recommend taking the trek to this island for the experience of a lifetime.

Discovery of the Decade

Ending this decade with a discovery of a perfect spot for a truly Papua New Guinean experience.

Now you may ask me, what do you mean by a Papua New Guinean experience? Well, I have friends who have traveled to Papua New Guinea and want to soak up what Papua New Guinea is all about. Friends who have visited for the weekend, stayed 2 weeks and even some stayed as long as 3 months.


Off course, flying them to Kokopo, Kavieng, Manus, Mt Hagen and Goroka would be the perfect cultural indoctrination for them.

But how about those who are here for business? That time is against them and all they need is an injection of Papua New Guinea in a day?

I dont want to show them Apec Haus, the hotels, the potholes and Gordon’s market. Nor do I want to show them the museums, the Parliament Haus or even the filthy Boroko Bus stop. I want to show them the real Papua New Guinean living even if it is only 1 night.

So my quest of find the perfect spot lead me to this discovery of the decade!

Drive to Gelebara from Gabone Village

Gelebara Kite Club……

A small setup by my newfound friend Pako. Now, I didnt think I’d find this place after hearing it from a few friends. But after scruff-ling over the internet for a few days, I came across Pako’s contact details.

Fate has it that the number works…….and within a few hours, the drive to discovery the perfect ‘shot of Papua New Guinea’ begins.



Gelebara Kite Club offers visitors a full beachfront, has 3 huts which are for rent, visitors can bring their own tents and setup. They provide cooking facilities, also pit toilets, rain water, and the can cook for you as well.

You can even lease the whole property for the weekend and have your own private functions, beach weddings or just time alone

What more can you ask for as an experience?

You can swim out the sea….walk a mile on the white sandy beach and as the sun sets, watch God paint the sky for you.



Oh btw…..there is 3G reception as well.

sunset views from the beach

Planet ICELAND…

My third trip to Europe was end of January 2019. Usually on these business trips, you fly-in the night before the meetings, do all the meetings for the week and fly out the next day. And I have just done that for the last 2 trips.

This year, I decided that I would do something different, that I would see abit of Europe after the meetings in Amsterdam. My plan was to take a train and travel to Norway via German, Denmark and Sweden. Reason for Norway was that I wanted to see the Aurora Borealis or Northern Lights.

Nas Daily – Planet Iceland – a great vidblog

So I requested for a week break after the meetings and during the week of travel, a friend alerted me to  fly direct to Iceland from Netherlands. So after little search, I found direct flights that are just $150 dollars (K400) return from Amsterdam to Reykjavik.

Cathedral of Christ the King in Reykjavik.

January is in the Winter Season for Iceland, and when I arrive…..from the airport to the hotel, there is only ICE covering almost everything I can see. One thing good about ICELAND is that they are so well organized. You have tour buses picking you right at the airport, drops you at the hotel, picks you up again when you ready and takes you straight to your tour sites. All you do is book them online and everything is organize for you.

 So off I went….see the Aurora Borealis and also get to swim in the ‘Secret Lake’ in the middle of the night! Yes, it was cold and it was minus 10 degrees but I have come these far to just stay in the room. I was determined to see that Northern Lights and show Papua New Guinea that I have seen it with my eyes.

But the highlight of my trip is the ‘Secret Lake’ in the middle of nowhere! After driving 2 hours, we came to a small lake, that we all changed and went it. The feeling was divine! I felt I was reborn that my whole system had reset itself…….now I feel I should do an annual pilgrimage there again.

Secret Lake in Reykjavik, Iceland

Guardians of Port Moresby

High up the hill on the eastern end of Idler’s Bay lies the remnants of once the largest Coastal Batteries in Port Moresby. The Basilisk Battery was built by the 8th Arm Troops Coy, Royal Australian Engineers in July 1944.

Basilisk was the largest of the five costal batteries protecting the Port Moresby area. Others were the Gemo Island Battery, Boera Battery, Bootless Battery and Paga Hill Battery which is the most famous amongst them in Port Moresby.

Short video of Basilisk Battery in Roku, Central Province

The Paga Hill Battery was planned in the early 19th century, when the threats of Russians invasion swept across the Pacific and the need for defence of strategic Australia coastal cities were imminent. Naturally, Port Moresby were also chosen to be defended and Paga Hill posed an excellent vintage point overlooking the Basilisk Passage and the Coral Seas.
 

The batteries were eventually built in early 1939’s when the Germans went to war in Europe and the Japanese decided to take on the Pacific. They had more military intelligence on the Pacific due to their workers working as plantation owners across German New Guinea.

The No. 2 gun at Basilisk Battery

The 38 men of 13th Heavy Battery of the Royal Australian Artillery began the construction of the Allied harbour defences consisting of several army batteries and a naval anti-submarine indicator loop installation as harbour protection. They were joined by the Papuan Infantry Battalion in 1940 when Australia approved the recruitment of locals to join the military.

Location of the Batteries
Australian Army Engineers and Papuan Infantry Battalion (PIB) soldiers in Port Moresby.

The Batteries were completed in record time, however, they never fired a single shot as the Japanese were prevented from coming to Port Moresby by the American’s in Manus. The US after defeating the Japanese arrived in 1945, and in 1946 the batteries were decommissioned and the guns were removed.

The concrete structures of the batteries however remains, reminding us of who are the true Guardians of Port Moresby.

http://indicatorloops.com/pm_guns.htm

Footprints

Dear Family & Friends,

Been trying to figure out what to do on my Birthday as I approach the halfway mark of the life expectancy in Papua New Guinea. I was wondering if I had at least influenced anyone I came across in the last 10-15 years and if there was any significant positive change in those who I had met.

I guess what I am trying to say is, am at the stage where I am thinking, will anyone remember me after I am gone? Maybe my children will …but would my grandchildren and great-grandchildren remember me?

Am thinking – what I need to leave behind is a legacy……….

So I have decided to create a website (blog) which I would document some of my passions (not the nasty ones). I have named it ‘Paura – the Digital Nomad’, that summarizes my two main passion of Technology and Travel. The last few years, I did much travel and involved in technology but did not get to pen them down for someone else to enjoy.

So I’ve created the nomadicpaura website will be collection of my interests in life going forward. Aside from Technology and Travel, there would be a page on Entrepreneurship, a page on Food (who dosnt like to eat or even cook? ) and of course, there would be another page on Photography.

I plan that this website would be use as a guide for anyone who hasn’t really grown any wings to fly away from their nests and also some pointers on travel locations, budget meals, tips on photography and some advice on technology and business.

Hope some of you follow me on this journey…