Category Archives: History

Labyrinth Of Pokop Yap Pohyomou

Throughout the main island of Manus, there are many stories about the cultural heroes popularly known as Pokops. Unlike heroes who belonged to a family and/or a village, it is said that Pokops just appeared out of nowhere, enjoyed a brief idyllic life, and then disappeared into the world of oblivion.

All Pokops were males and none of them had a family history leading up to him and similarly none were claimed to have left descendants to claim and inherit their famous mountain-top havens. Pokop yap Pohyomou, Pokop yap Pohonanus, Pokop yap Pwenet and Pokop yap Tarau all lived on Hill Top Havens. The havens, mind you, are all rock formations and are the highest of points of the areas they occupy

This poses many interesting questions in one’s mind about their existence. Did the Pokops really live in the time past or did they exist only in the myths? Why is it that many of them attracted beautiful women and yet left no descendants? Maybe they were what the moderns would call male chauvinists? Or maybe they were a unique breed of supernatural human beings?

Whatever they are, the Pokop’s left their petroglyph and their existence in every hilltop or Tableland they occupy. These markings are similar to markings found all over the world which points to super-natural beings.

Labyrinth Petroglyphs

Labyrinth Petroglphs

Polyomo Tableland the home of Pokop Yap Pohyomou contains a strange marking that is rumored to be from aliens. These strange markings can also be found on Pwenet Tableland in Manus and also in some areas’s of the world.

After looking at these markings, I had to search on google for similar markings and have found many in Europe and some in South America as well. It is not know the reason why there is one right at the heart of the Island of Manus but it seems there may be a connection to the site through the legends of Pokops

The story of Pokop Yap Pohyomou has been well covered by Dr. Bernard Minol and you can read some of them on this website.

Similar Labyrinth around the world

The earliest examples, precise symbols found carved on rocks and painted or scratched on pottery, date to the Neolithic and Bronze Age periods, although are often difficult to date precisely. The same design, found on coins from Crete from the first few centuries BC, symbolise the labyrinth at Knossos in which the Minotaur was imprisoned. Popular throughout the Roman Empire as a protective and decorative symbol on the mosaic floors of civic buildings and villas, they were also constructed outdoors at this time as a playground for children and as a test of skill for soldiers on horseback.

During the medieval period the labyrinth symbol developed into a more intricate form, reflecting the complexities of faith, life and philosophy in the medieval mind. Occurring first in manuscripts, it was subsequently laid in coloured marble and tiles on the floors of cathedrals and churches, most famously at Chartres Cathedral, where the labyrinth constructed in the early 13th century survives to this day, and indeed, has become an object of pilgrimage for modern visitors.

NASA Published book suggest Aliens drawings

Though the White House maintains that there has not yet been credible evidence that suggests the presence of extra terrestrial life, a new volume of an official NASA e-book released this week details the hunt for such evidence by the space agency and other organizations and even suggests that unusual patterns cut into rock actually “might have been made by aliens.

The book edited by Dr. Douglas Vakoch, the director of Interstellar Message Composition at the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence organization, includes ”incisive critique with hope that there is a response to the skepticism behind these critiques.” Vakoch, according to his profile on SETI’s website, “researches ways that different civilizations might create messages that could be transmitted across interstellar space, allowing communication between humans and extraterrestrials even without face-to-face contact.”

“Archaeology, Anthropology, and Interstellar Communication” has contributors that “raise questions that may have been overlooked by physical scientists about the ease of establishing meaningful communication with an extraterrestrial intelligence.”

Vakoch wrote in the book’s introduction that is a challenge for scientists to actually “recognize manifestations of extraterrestrial intelligence, even when they resemble a naturally occurring phenomenon.” He points out archaeologist Paul Wason’s argument that there needs to be an “intellectual context” for researchers to even o identify signs of intelligence.

Need to Preserve Pokop Pohyomou Petroglyphs

Petroglyphs from Pohyomou Tableland needs to be preserved. These petroglyphs are ancestral sites which our forefathers lived for many years before disappearing into the unknowns.

The petroglyphs would interest any archeologist as there has never been one to study these petroglyphs and the meaning surrounding them.


Labyrinth on Polyomou Tableland

Greek Mythology

Around 700 BC, the poet Hesiod’s Theogony offered the first written cosmogony, or origin story, of Greek mythology. The Theogony tells the story of the universe’s journey from nothingness (Chaos, a primeval void) to being, and details an elaborate family tree of elements, gods and goddesses who evolved from Chaos and descended from Gaia (Earth), Ouranos (Sky), Pontos (Sea) and Tartaros (the Underworld).

Pantheon

Greek Mythology: The Olympians

At the center of Greek mythology is the pantheon of deities who were said to live on Mount Olympus, the highest mountain in Greece. From their perch, they ruled every aspect of human life. Olympian gods and goddesses looked like men and women (though they could change themselves into animals and other things) and were–as many myths recounted–vulnerable to human foibles and passions.

The twelve main Olympians are:

  • Zeus (Jupiter, in Roman mythology): the king of all the gods (and father to many) and god of weather, law and fate
  • Hera (Juno): the queen of the gods and goddess of women and marriage
  • Aphrodite (Venus): goddess of beauty and love
  • Apollo (Apollo): god of prophesy, music and poetry and knowledge
  • Ares (Mars): god of war
  • Artemis (Diana): goddess of hunting, animals and childbirth
  • Athena (Minerva): goddess of wisdom and defense
  • Demeter (Ceres): goddess of agriculture and grain
  • Dionysos (Bacchus): god of wine, pleasure and festivity
  • Hephaistos (Vulcan): god of fire, metalworking and sculpture
  • Hermes (Mercury): god of travel, hospitality and trade and Zeus’s personal messenger
  • Poseidon (Neptune): god of the sea

Other gods and goddesses sometimes included in the roster of Olympians are:

  • Hades (Pluto): god of the underworld
  • Hestia (Vesta): goddess of home and family
  • Eros (Cupid): god of sex and minion to Aphrodite
Temple of Zeus the Olympian

Greek Mythology: Heroes and Monsters

Greek mythology does not just tell the stories of gods and goddesses, however.

Human heroes–such as Heracles, the adventurer who performed 12 impossible labors for King Eurystheus (and was subsequently worshipped as a god for his accomplishment); Pandora, the first woman, whose curiosity brought evil to mankind; Pygmalion, the king who fell in love with an ivory statue; Arachne, the weaver who was turned into a spider for her arrogance; handsome Trojan prince Ganymede who became the cupbearer for the gods; Midas, the king with the golden touch; and Narcissus, the young man who fell in love with his own reflection–are just as significant. Monsters and “hybrids” (human-animal forms) also feature prominently in the tales: the winged horse Pegasus, the horse-man Centaur, the lion-woman Sphinx and the bird-woman Harpies, the one-eyed giant Cyclops, automatons (metal creatures given life by Hephaistos), manticores and unicorns, Gorgons, pygmies, minotaurs, satyrs and dragons of all sorts. Many of these creatures have become almost as well known as the gods, goddesses and heroes who share their stories.

Temple of Apollos in Naxos

Reference: https://www.history.com/topics/ancient-history/greek-mythology

Ancient Ruins in Athens

A walk around Athens and you’d surely come up to a important ancient sites from the Classical and Roman times

The Acroplis

The Acropolis also called the Sacred Rock, is the most important ancient heritage of the country. It is also the trademark and most famous site of Athens and of Greece. It has been the main attraction of Athens since the 5th century BC and is dedicated to Athena, the goddess of wisdom and protector of the city.

Acropolis

The Parthenon

The Parthenon, the most famous ancient Greek temple ever, stands proudly over the modern megalopolis of Athens, a reminder of the great civilization he has witnessed. The Acropolis can be seen from almost every part of Athens. It was and still is, without any doubt, the ultimate achievement of the city classical and architectural glory

Parthenon

Herodeion Theatre

The Herodeion Theatre is one of the most impressive monuments of Athens and it is today hosting the Athens Festival with performances of theatre, music, and dance. The theatre is open to visitors only during performances. It is located at the south slope of the Acropolis and was added in 161 AD during the Roman rule. The theatre was built by Herodes Atticus, a wealthy Roman, in memory of his wife Regilla. It has exceptional acoustic capacities and can sit up to 5,000 spectators. It has a facade of 28 m high and 2,4 m width.

Herodeion Theatre

Temple of Hephaestus

The Temple of Hephaestus is the best preserved Doric temple in Greece. It was dedicated to Hephaestus, the god of the forge, hence the reason why the temple used to be in the center of numerous metalwork shops and foundries. It was built during Pericles rebuilding program.

Temple of Hephaestus

Temple of Zeus

The Temple of Olympian Zeus took 700 years to be built and is the larger that was ever created. The work was completed by Emperor Hadrian in 131 AD. The huge Temple is composed of 104 Corinthian columns of 17 m high. Very little is left of his greatness today since only 17 columns are still standing.

Temple of Olympian Zeus
Panathenaic Stadium

Panathenaic Stadium

The Panathenaic (Roman) Stadium was built in the 4th century BC. It was hosting the Panathenaic Athletic contests. Herodes Atticus inaugurated the stadium when he rebuilds the seats with Pentelic marble. The stadium was strangely abandoned for centuries. It was finally restored in order to welcome the first modern Olympic Games of 1896.

Arch of Hadrian

Arch of Hadrian

The Arch of Hadrian was built by Emperor Hadrian in 132 AD in order to mark the limit between Ancient Athens and his new city. It is also a commemoration of the consecration of the Temple of Olympian Zeus. It is located at the end of Amalias Avenue.

Source: https://www.greeka.com/attica/athens/ancient-sites/